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Category: Lymphoma

Lymphoma Symptoms and Signs

Here are the common lymphoma symptoms that someone may experiencing. You better consult your doctor if any one of these symptoms appear or felt.

1. It is a good habit to check your body for any kinds of lumps that are already growing at certain areas. In this case, enlarged lymph nodes usually develop in the groin, armpits and neck. You will notice these if you are going to inspect your body when you are done bathing or when you are changing clothes. These lumps are painless, especially during the first few weeks of the cancer development. These nodes usually lead to other symptoms that are not exclusive to this kind of sickness.

2. The cells that are infected with whatever is causing the illness produce special chemicals that may cause the whole body to itch. This may become intolerable no matter what kind of creams you put on your skin, so you may be more determined to get checked by a professional. It may be okay to resort to self-medication during the first day or even two, but you really have to take the matter more seriously if the itchiness doesn’t stop after you have tried everything. You wouldn’t want to be faced with greater consequences as a result of your inaction, so you really have to consult the doctor to know what’s the matter.

3. As the cancer cells grow, you will feel weaker and won’t have the energy to do things that you used to enjoy. These cancer cells utilize most of the body’s nutrients. Aside from this, you are also losing the drive to eat. This will lead to alarming weight loss and if you are not going to do anything about it, you will find it hard to enjoy life and become productive.

Even if you don’t have it, it will help to be armed with the right information about how to detect if you have lymphoma symptoms. It is also very important to undergo overall body exam once a year to make sure that you are fit and you are not suffering from any kinds of illnesses.

 

Panicking is never a good thing. Imagine yourself running back and forth inside your house after you felt a lump of in you armpits. It is very possible that you have lymphoma or cancer of the lymph nodes. But still going around in panic is never the answer. Early detection is very important in this situation for treatment of the cancer is more effective. But one could actually check if he or she has lymphoma by looking out for a few lymphoma symptoms and waning signs. But of course, self diagnosis is never a replacement for the actual, proper and effective medical testing.

As mentioned before, one of the first warning signs that you probably would observe is the presence of lumps not only in your armpits but in your neck and groin as well. These lumps are painless and signs of enlarged lymph nodes. However, an enlarged lymph node is not specific to lymphoma. There might be other underlying conditions for the cause of swollen or enlarged lymph nodes.

Another sign is sudden weight loss. If you found yourself suddenly loosing weight without no apparent cause then lymphoma symptoms might be the reason. Although, sudden weight loss is in itself an indication that something is not right with your body’s state of health so it is imperative that you visit your doctor for a check up. In the case of lymphoma patients, however, they found themselves losing ten or even fifteen pounds over just a couple of months without doing any exercises or changing their diet or eating habits at all.

Fever is also an indication of a possible lymphoma diagnosis especially if the fever comes and goes and is like that for a long time now. Fever often comes with body infections. People often mistook lymphoma symptoms as mere infections. Again, it is reiterated that consulting your doctors when you experience such fevers is highly recommended.

Other signs include excessive sweating at night which not only is quite unique to lymphoma but is also very uncomfortable which in a way signals the person to have his body checked. People who experience this abnormal sweating behavior wake up practically drenched even if they did not have any nightmares whatsoever or fell asleep in a room with extremely hot temperature. Just like excessive sweating, feeling itchy all over is another unique  lymphoma symptoms. The itchiness comes from the release of chemicals from the cancer cells.

Fatigue and loss of appetite are also quite common in lymphoma patients. People actually feel this way because the cancer cells have grown considerably that they are practically sucking most of the nutrients you get from the food you eat. And with the loss of appetite the cancer cells sucks more of the body’s nutrients that’s why it is only natural that you feel weak.

The good thing about medical science is that they continue to find ways of treating various ailments and diseases. Lymphoma can be treated and with early detection the treatments are more effective with more positive results. We just need to heed the lymphoma warning signs to help patients with lymphoma get an immediate diagnosis and treatment.

 

Detecting Early Signs of Lymphoma

There are many types of cancer and it is best that you become aware of the symptoms of signs of each so that you won’t be surprised after spending lots of time thinking about things and realizing that you are already infected with one. Many kinds of the cancer disease are hard to determine, especially at the first phase, which is a vital stage to know if you have this so that you can undergo the necessary medications while the sickness can still be cured. One kind of cancer with symptoms that are confusing is known as lymphoma. Most of the signs and changes on your body that will occur if you have this can also happen in other kinds of illnesses.

This kind of cancer starts in the lymphocytes, which can be found in the body’s immune system. The condition will develop into solid tumor on the lymphoid cells. This illness is categorized in many types that are part of an extensive group of disorders that are referred to as hematological neoplasms.

If you are starting to feel vital changes on your system, you must not disregard this. Check these common symptoms of this illness and consult your doctor for more information and proper treatment.

 

Lymphoma Treatment and Remedies

It is logically difficult for someone who has just been diagnosed with lymphoma to truly understand the various lymphoma treatment options available. It is a common knowledge that there are about 30 different kinds of lymphoma. Thus, there could be numerous treatment options available. A single type of the disease could call for a specific treatment option.

Medical supervision is absolutely a must following detection of lymphoma symptoms. You need to first ascertain how serious the condition is. Lymphoma, once detected, should be immediately and accordingly treated. Remember to take medical treatment as per your doctor’s advice. There are many options available, as mentioned, but there are several that usually stand out. There are four major types of lymphoma treatment available, namely, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, stem cell or bone marrow transplant, and antibody therapy.

Chemotherapy involves the administration or application of drugs as infusions into the veins of the patients. Chemotherapy could also be taken in the form of oral pills. The most common types of chemotherapy for lymphoma are R-CHOP, CHOP, and ABVD. On the other hand, radiotherapy uses high-energy light rays that are specially and strategically directed at the cancer cells targeted. This form of therapy could be delivered even over small body areas as in involved field radiation or over large areas as in extended field radiation.

Stem cell or bone marrow transplant uses high dosage of radiation or chemotherapy to specifically kill targeted cancer cells. The bone marrow is saved during the process through transplantation of a new one or through transplantation of stem cells. Lastly, antibody therapy, also known as biological therapy, uses specific drugs to target special molecules across the cancer cells’ surfaces.

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is often treated using radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The treatment options are usually based on the current stage of lymphoma and on several prognostic factors. Chemotherapy is more used in all patients regardless of stage. Radiation may be used only during the early stages of the condition.

There are almost 25 various kinds of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Several of them behave differently compared to others. Treatment used depends on the specific type as well as observable behavior of the NHL. Chemotherapy is the most popular. Antibody therapy and/or radiation therapy may only be added to complement chemotherapy for additional benefits.

Home remedies could also be tried to cure this disease, especially after early detection. Such remedies should only be considered as secondary only to  lymphoma treatment. The best natural remedy is to strategically detoxify your body. To do so, you have to drink lots of water and fruit juices. Avoid intake of alcohol and caffeine. There are foods that enhance the detoxification process like carrots, beets, mushrooms, and broccoli. During the process strictly avoid consumption of sugars, saturated fats, and refined foods.

Fruits and vegetables could be best as natural  lymphoma treatment. These include pears, apples, parsley, and lettuce. These foods detoxify the body as well and at the same time aid quick cleansing of your body’s lymphatic system. Chinese herbs like codonopsis and ginseng could also be tried.

 

Various Procedure in Treating Lymphoma

Cancer is a word that most of us dread to hear from our doctors. We know that it’s something that should not be taken lightly, plus we can’t even count how many times we have seen in the movies and television about the difficulties of the disease and more often than not the sad ending that follows. So hearing you have cancer of the lymph cells, which what lymphoma treatment really is, is more than enough to give you and your family a scare. Lymphoma treatment is never easy both physically and mentally for the patient. Having the full support of the family is a good thing to have in situations like these.

Lymphoma develops when the lymph cells begin to multiply quickly beyond what is normal. This abnormal growth soon forms tumors. These lymph cells are found in blood and lymph nodes thus with the grown of the cancer cells it is only natural that the lymph nodes enlarge and manifests as painless lumps in the neck, armpits or groin.

There are two main types of lymphoma. The most common one is the Hodgkin’s lymphoma. This type is distinguished from the rest by the presence of the Reed-Sternberg cell. The spread of the cancer cells in Hodgkin’s lymphoma is more predictable and often quite limited unlike the non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas where cancer cells develop first in other organs before spreading into the lymph nodes. The non-Hodgkin’s types of lymphomas are classified according low-grade, intermediate-grade or high-grade lymphomas which basically is based on how quickly the cancer cells spread.

Because of the number of types of lymphomas, the treatments vary. Often the treatments are combinations of various therapies and procedures. It is normal to have a number of lymphoma treatment for a single lymphoma case. Once the type of lymphoma has been diagnosed and identified, the next step is to determine what stage it is in now. The kinds and extent of treatment of the cancer is dependent on the age of the patient and the degree or stage of the lymphoma. The treatment methods are either through chemotherapy, radiation therapy, antibody therapy (or biological therapy) and bone-marrow or stem cell transplantation. Again, combining one or two of these treatment methods is possible to address the present condition of a patient.

Chemotherapy uses various drugs to kill the tumor or cancer cells. The drugs can be taken orally or through injection. The advantage of using chemotherapy is that the drugs do not cause that much damage to the nearby normal and healthy cells. Radiotherapy, on the other hand, uses X-rays to kill the tumor cells. The rays damage the DNA of the cancer cells and because the DNA is damaged the cancer cells are unable to multiply which halts that growth of the cancer. Nearby healthy cells are damaged from the radiation bombardment so the goal in radiotherapy is minimize the damage to nearby, healthy cells. That is why those who undergo radiotherapy is scheduled to receive small doses of radiation at a time to lessen the damage to the cells.

Another treatment is the antibody therapy which uses antibodies which target unique molecules of a cancer cell. This attack from the antibody will eventually kill the cancer cells. And finally, the last way of treating lymphoma is by bone marrow or stem cell transplantations. These are medical procedures where the stem cells that were destroyed by high doses of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are replaced through surgery.

Lymphoma What You Should Know About It?

What is Lymphoma?

Lymphoma is simply defined as a type of cancer in the lymph system. British physician Thomas Hodgkin was the first to publish initial descriptions of the condition in 1832. Thus, the specific type of lymphoma he described (Hodgkin’s lymphoma) was appropriately named after him. After his initial description, many other studies looked at several other forms or types of the cancerous disease.

A cancer appears when several of our bodies’ cells begin behaving abnormally. The body is comprised of various kinds of cells found in different organs like the nerves of blood. At times, normal cells cease getting usual biological signals that make them stop growing. When that happens, the cells abnormally continue to multiply and grow. This is the formation of cancer cells. When the cancer cells grow, the affected organ stops working normally. Several of the cancer cells also start to break off from the original site, spreading into many other body parts and affecting many other organs.

The lymph system comprises an interconnected network with thin nodes and tubes carrying white blood cells. Such cells are responsible for fighting off infections. This way, they are vitally significant to the body’s overall well-being. When a lymphocyte (a specific kind of white blood cell) in the lymph system starts to become cancerous, it would tend to multiply and grow leading to formation of lymphoma.

Which part of the body is usually affected by lymphoma? The cancer could affect any part of the lymph system. Usually, patients initially notice abnormal enlargement of the lymph nodes, specifically in the areas of the groin, the neck, and the armpits. However, lymphoma could also manifest in several other organs of the body. This is because minimal amounts of lymph tissue pass into practically every organ in the body as white blood cells reach out to different areas to perform control of infections.

This type of cancer is currently the most usual form of blood cancer or hematological malignancy especially in the developed countries. Lymphoma comprises about 5.3% of overall forms of cancers in the United States alone. It comprises of up to 55.6% of blood cancers diagnosed. According to data released by the US National Institute of Health, Hodgkin’s lymphomas is accounting for about 1% of total cases of cancer across the country. Patients with HIV infection and exposure to certain medications and drugs have higher incidences of lymphoma for obvious reasons.

Many forms of lymphoma are indolent (occurring lifelong even without medication or treatment) or aggressive (causing fast deterioration of health and eventually death). However, most incidences of aggressive lymphomas are responding ideally to treatment. In other words, they are curable. This condition is not a single type of cancer because it comprises of a group of several related forms of cancers. There are about 30 various types of identified lymphoma. In a broad sense, lymphomas could be categorized as either Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Of course, each type has its own features and manifestations and results to different outcomes in the long term.

 

Whenever you get sick, what’s the first thing that you do? Know what you have. Either it’s a simple fever or a complicated illness, the very first thing that you do is to gather information to find out your current condition. The same thing with lymphoma, whether you research things on your own or go to a doctor (although this should always be the case since self diagnosis can bring you only so far) for advice, your target is to get all you need know about the disease.

Lymphoma is basically a cancer of the lymphatic system. The system is composed of various nodes or glands situated in different places of our body. These glands are connected by vessels that carry the lymph fluid or the white blood cells which help fight diseases. As you might have remembered in your high school biology class, the white blood cells help fight the bacteria and diseases that enter our body. And because these glands are connected to each other, once lymphoma hits a gland, there’s a good chance that the cancer cells spread throughout the body via the lymph vessels. You should know this fact out front: no cure has been discovered yet that would eliminate the disease. Nonetheless, there are new techniques, medicines and medical procedures that have brought more positive treatments for people with lymphoma.

There are two kinds of lymphoma, namely Hodgkin’s lymphomas and Non Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL). The first one, the Hodgkin’s disease owes its name to Thomas Hodgkin (1798-1866). He was the first one who published a paper about the disease. This kind of lymphoma is capable of spreading from one lymph node to another. It is also observed that people diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma has the presence of Reed-Sternberg cells which can only be detected by the aid of a microscope.

The other kind of lymphoma is the non-Hodgkin kind. This kind is described as having larger than normal lymph nodes and is accompanied by fever and weight loss. There are about 16 sub-types which do not fall under the conditions described by Hodgkin’s lymphoma. These sub-types are grouped according to aggressiveness which basically means the cancer cells are fast-growing. NHL lymphomas include chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Burkitt lym-phoma, mantle cell lymphomas, follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and immunoblastic large cell lymphoma.

Treatment is either radiation therapy or chemotherapy. The age, sex and stage of the cancer’s development plays a role in determining the kind of treatment patients will undergo. Early detection is crucial. Most of the patients do survive the treatment especially if they have been diagnosed during the early stages of the lymphoma.

Some of the more common symptoms of lymphomas include painless swelling in the lymph nodes of the neck, underarm, or groin. People with lymphomas also might experience fever, tiredness, weight loss, itchiness, red patches on the skin, nausea, vomiting and sometimes abdominal pain.

Those with low-grade lymphomas will encounter a very slow growth of the cancer cells and will experience very few of the symptoms. The problem with low-grade lymphomas is that even though they respond well to chemotherapy, they oftentimes return and is considered incurable unlike high-grade lymphomas. With the latter, treatment involves chemotherapy, with or without radiation therapy.

Admittedly, the information above is not all that you need to know about lymphoma. There are more facts that you need to find out for yourself especially if you have been diagnosed with having lymphoma.